The Online Journal of Clinical Audits, Vol 8, No 4 (2016)

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Audit on adequacy of back-slab application for ankle fracture

Suganth Jayaraman, Syed Haque, David Ellis

Abstract


  • Aims -To analyse the quality of back slab applied in the A&E at MRI for adult patients with ankle fractures by taking into consideration the following factors namely ankle neutrality in sagittal plane after back slab, adequacy of moulding the plaster and if the mortis has been satisfactorily reduced.Methods - The primary factors analysed are ankle neutrality in sagittal plane after back slab and secondary factors analysed are adequacy of moulding the plaster and extent of restoration of tibio-talar congruency. Application form to Clinical Audit & Risk Management Department, approval with audit no. clinical coding CMFT, Patients presenting to adult A&E at Manchester Royal infirmary with ankle fracture as either primary or secondary diagnosis between the time span April 2016 to May 2016 were taken into consideration. All ankle fractures with and without dislocation were included. Those who were treated with air-cast boot at the initial setting were excluded. Data were collection from central intelligence and clinical coding CMFT and the post POP x-ray images were analysed on PACS.Results - Out of the 32 patients with ankle fractures analysed in this audit, 19 had back slab plaster applied in plantar flexion, 19 did not have adequate moulding and 2 of them were left with talar shift .Conclusions - It is evident that a majority of back slabs are applied incorrectly. Few ankles were also left subluxed which can have a significant impact on the final outcomeAims -To analyse the quality of back slab applied in the A&E at MRI for adult patients with ankle fractures by taking into consideration the following factors namely ankle neutrality in sagittal plane after back slab, adequacy of moulding the plaster and if the mortis has been satisfactorily reduced.Methods - The primary factors analysed are ankle neutrality in sagittal plane after back slab and secondary factors analysed are adequacy of moulding the plaster and extent of restoration of tibio-talar congruency. Application form to Clinical Audit & Risk Management Department, approval with audit no. clinical coding CMFT, Patients presenting to adult A&E at Manchester Royal infirmary with ankle fracture as either primary or secondary diagnosis between the time span April 2016 to May 2016 were taken into consideration. All ankle fractures with and without dislocation were included. Those who were treated with air-cast boot at the initial setting were excluded. Data were collection from central intelligence and clinical coding CMFT and the post POP x-ray images were analysed on PACS.Results - Out of the 32 patients with ankle fractures analysed in this audit, 19 had back slab plaster applied in plantar flexion, 19 did not have adequate moulding and 2 of them were left with talar shift .Conclusions - It is evident that a majority of back slabs are applied incorrectly. Few ankles were also left subluxed which can have a significant impact on the final outcomeAims -To analyse the quality of back slab applied in the A&E at MRI for adult patients with ankle fractures by taking into consideration the following factors namely ankle neutrality in sagittal plane after back slab, adequacy of moulding the plaster and if the mortis has been satisfactorily reduced.Methods - The primary factors analysed are ankle neutrality in sagittal plane after back slab and secondary factors analysed are adequacy of moulding the plaster and extent of restoration of tibio-talar congruency. Application form to Clinical Audit & Risk Management Department, approval with audit no. clinical coding CMFT, Patients presenting to adult A&E at Manchester Royal infirmary with ankle fracture as either primary or secondary diagnosis between the time span April 2016 to May 2016 were taken into consideration. All ankle fractures with and without dislocation were included. Those who were treated with air-cast boot at the initial setting were excluded. Data were collection from central intelligence and clinical coding CMFT and the post POP x-ray images were analysed on PACS.Results - Out of the 32 patients with ankle fractures analysed in this audit, 19 had back slab plaster applied in plantar flexion, 19 did not have adequate moulding and 2 of them were left with talar shift .Conclusions - It is evident that a majority of back slabs are applied incorrectly. Few ankles were also left subluxed which can have a significant impact on the final outcomeAims -To analyse the quality of back slab applied in the A&E at MRI for adult patients with ankle fractures by taking into consideration the following factors namely ankle neutrality in sagittal plane after back slab, adequacy of moulding the plaster and if the mortis has been satisfactorily reduced.Methods - The primary factors analysed are ankle neutrality in sagittal plane after back slab and secondary factors analysed are adequacy of moulding the plaster and extent of restoration of tibio-talar congruency. Application form to Clinical Audit & Risk Management Department, approval with audit no. clinical coding CMFT, Patients presenting to adult A&E at Manchester Royal infirmary with ankle fracture as either primary or secondary diagnosis between the time span April 2016 to May 2016 were taken into consideration. All ankle fractures with and without dislocation were included. Those who were treated with air-cast boot at the initial setting were excluded. Data were collection from central intelligence and clinical coding CMFT and the post POP x-ray images were analysed on PACS.Results - Out of the 32 patients with ankle fractures analysed in this audit, 19 had back slab plaster applied in plantar flexion, 19 did not have adequate moulding and 2 of them were left with talar shift .Conclusions - It is evident that a majority of back slabs are applied incorrectly. Few ankles were also left subluxed which can have a significant impact on the final outcome
frAims -To analyse the quality of back slab applied in the A&E at MRI for adult patients with ankle fractures by taking into consideration the following factors namely ankle neutrality in sagittal plane after back slab, adequacy of moulding the plaster and if the mortis has been satisfactorily reduced.

Methods - The primary factors analysed are ankle neutrality in sagittal plane after back slab and secondary factors analysed are adequacy of moulding the plaster and extent of restoration of tibio-talar congruency.

Application form to Clinical Audit & Risk Management Department, approval with audit no. clinical coding CMFT,

Patients presenting to adult A&E at Manchester Royal infirmary with ankle fracture as either primary or secondary diagnosis between the time span April 2016 to May 2016 were taken into consideration. All ankle fractures with and without dislocation were included. Those who were treated with air-cast boot at the initial setting were excluded. Data were collection from central intelligence and clinical coding CMFT and the post POP x-ray images were analysed on PACS.

Results - Out of the 32 patients with ankle fractures analysed in this audit, 19 had back slab plaster  applied  in plantar flexion, 19 did not have adequate moulding and 2 of them were left with talar shift .

Conclusions - It is evident that a majority of back slabs are applied incorrectly. Few ankles were also left subluxed which can have a significant impact on the final outcome.

 actures by taking into consideration the following factors namely ankle neutrality in sagittal plane afterback slab, adequacy of moulding the plaster and if the mortis has been satisfactorily reduced.Methods – The primary factors analysed are ankle neutrality in sagittal plane after back slab and secondary factors analysed are adequacy of moulding the plaster and extent of restoration of tibio-talarcongruency.Application form to Clinical Audit & Risk Management Department, approval with audit no. clinical codingCMFT,Patients presenting to adult A&E at Manchester Royal infirmary with ankle fracture as either primary orsecondary diagnosis between the time span April 2016 to May 2016 were taken into consideration. Allankle fractures with and without dislocation were included. Those who were treated with air-cast boot atthe initial setting were excluded. Data were collection from central intelligence and clinical coding CMFTand the post POP x-ray images were analysed on PACS.Results – Out of the 32 patients with ankle fractures analysed in this audit, 19 had back slab plaster applied in plantar flexion, 19 did not have adequate moulding and 2 of them were left with talar shift .Conclusions – It is evident that a majority of back slabs are applied incorrectly. Few ankles were also left subluxed which can have a significant impact on the final outcome

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